Mathias Nygaard

 

mathias.nygaard@newman.se

Mathias Nygaard

Presentation

I started working at the Newman Institute in 2015, full time since 2018. I have a background in archaeology, history, exegesis and philology (BA Uppsala, Sweden, MA Jerusalem, Israel, MTh and PhD Aberdeen, UK). I have also done research and fieldwork in other countries (Germany, Japan, Norway, etc). I have previously worked at universities in Japan and Norway teaching subjects such as ethics, philosophy, religious studies, cultural studies and biblical science.

Research Interests

My main areas are Abrahamitic religions and the western history of thought. My methods range from philological work and philosophical discussions to qualitative fieldwork. At present I work on the following themes:

  1. Death and Self in Hellenistic Philosophy
  2. Religion, Secularity and Tradition in Scandinavia
  3. Vernacular Religious Practices in Europe
  4. The reception of the Bible in Western Philosophy
  5. Food, Religion and Identity

Teaching

I am responsible for exegetical subjects at the Newman Institute and occasionally also teach philosophical subjects.

Selected Publications

Tomte-Stories in Swedish Hälsingland: Place and Vernacular Religion”. Folklore, 2019.

Frigjørende samfunnsvitenskap: muligheter og utfordringer” (Emancipatory social science: possibilities and challenges). In Vitenskapsteori for Samfunnsvitenskapene. Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk. 2019.

Bakhtinian Carnivalesque and Paul´s Foolish Gospel”. Biblical Interpretation 26/3. Leiden Brill, 2018. 369-390.

Interchange and Deification in Romans 8”. Horizons in Biblical Theology 39/2. Leiden: Brill, 2017.

Death as an ethical metaphor in Seneca and Paul’s Letter to the Romans.” In Paul and the Greco-Roman Philosophical Tradition. Library of New Testament Studies. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Prayer in the Gospels: A Theological Exegesis of the Ideal Pray-er. BINT 114. Leiden: Brill 2012.

Life for all men: Universalism in Romans 5 and 11”. Festskrift for Egil Grandhagen. Trondheim: Akademika, 2012.